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how to pick the best berries

May 18, 2015
by Lacy
1 Comment

Seasonal Eating: Berries

It’s berry season! Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries are the perfect addition to morning yogurt, brunch pancakes and also make excellent afternoon snacks. Here are some tasty recipes to try:

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Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.com

May 10, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
2 Comments

Rum Currant Scones with Rummy Icing

This is an alternative to Rum Raisin Scones. For me personally, raisins are too big and squishy for baked goods. I liked this currant version of the Rum Raisin idea best – the currants didn’t absorb as much rum so the scones were merely suggestive of rum in a very pleasant way. Plus the milder scone base made it a delicious idea to drizzle them with an icing made from the soaking liquid.

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.com

Rum Currant Scones with Rummy Icing

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup rum
  • 1/2 cup currants
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1.25 cups cream
  • For icing:
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • dash cinnamon
  • 2-3 T soaking liquid

Instructions

  1. Soak currants overnight in rum.
  2. Heat oven to 425 degrees.
  3. Whisk dry ingredients in a bowl to combine (flour, sugar, bp, cinn, & salt).
  4. Drain rum off of currants - keep soaking liquid to use in the icing!
  5. Stir currants into the dry ingredients.
  6. Add the cream, and stir.
  7. Once most of the liquid is incorporated use your hands to quasi-knead the dough against the sides of the bowl until it comes together and all the dry ingredients are absorbed. (You could knead it on a surface - but that's just one more thing to clean up!)
  8. Shape the dough into a disk about 1" thick.
  9. Place on a baking sheet or baking mat and cut into 8 scones.
  10. Divide into 8 triangles and spread them across the baking mat/sheet.
  11. Bake for 17 minutes, until the tops are starting to brown.
  12. Once scones cool, apply icing. For a milder icing, try maybe just 1 T rum and 1 T milk. Start with just the 2 T liquid and see what consistency icing that gets you. Add more liquid bit by bit until you achieve a good drizzling consistency.
http://laughinglemonpie.com/rum-currant-scones-with-rummy-icing/

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.com

May 10, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
3 Comments

Rum Raisin Scones

Read all the details and background of the Rum Scone saga here. Or cut to the chase and see the recipe below 😉

I originally tried this recipe with vanilla and using a new vanilla technique but found that the rum flavor overpowered the vanilla seeds and so it wasn’t a worthwhile use of such a pricey ingredient.

Note – this is an overnight recipe! The raisins need that time to soak. It’s possible to try simmering the raisins in rum on the stovetop, that might save the overnight step.

If raisins aren’t your thing and/or you’d like a slightly less rum-raisiny scone, I’ve also got a recipe for Rum Currant Scones which are much milder and my personal fave.

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.com

Rum Raisin Scones

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup rum
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1.25 cups cream
  • For icing:
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • dash cinnamon
  • 2-3 T liquid

Instructions

  1. Soak raisins overnight in rum.
  2. Heat oven to 425 degrees.
  3. Whisk dry ingredients in a bowl to combine (flour, sugar, bp, cinn, & salt).
  4. Drain rum off of raisins - keep soaking liquid if you'd like to use it in an icing!
  5. Stir raisins into the dry ingredients.
  6. Add the cream, and stir.
  7. Once most of the liquid is incorporated use your hands to quasi-knead the dough against the sides of the bowl until it comes together and all the dry ingredients are absorbed. (You could knead it on a surface - but that's just one more thing to clean up!)
  8. Shape the dough into a disk about 1" thick.
  9. Place on a baking sheet or baking mat and cut into 8 scones.
  10. Divide into 8 triangles and spread them across the baking mat/sheet.
  11. Bake for 17 minutes, until the tops are starting to brown.
  12. Once scones cool, apply icing. You can use the remaining rum/raisin liquid in your icing, but watch out - it's strong stuff! Alternately you could go mild by using milk as your icing liquid. Start with just the 2 T and see what consistency that gets you. Add more liquid bit by bit until you achieve a good drizzling consistency.
http://laughinglemonpie.com/rum-raisin-scones/

May 10, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
2 Comments

Boozy Scones!

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.comSometimes a great idea hits and you just have to run with it. [Cue the unused bottle of rum hanging out in a cupboard and the rapidly desiccating currants and raisins in the pantry.]

Yep – that’s right: Scones + booze. Specifically, Rum Raisin Scones.

To be thorough, I tried two batches – one with raisins and one with currants. For me the currants were preferable, but I’m kind of anti-raisin in general (too squishy), especially in baked goods. However, for hubs the currant version wasn’t rum-raisin-y enough and so batch #2 featured bona fide raisins bursting with rummy juice.

In both cases I soaked the tiny dried fruits overnight. The currants, being already so small and dried, didn’t absorb much rum. The raisins plumped up nicely and absorbed a lot, making a much more rummy scone. One as of yet untested idea would be to cook the fruit in the rum, to boil it for some time rather than soaking overnight. Simmering would save time and also cook off the alcohol, which some bakers/eaters might appreciate.

To my mind and palette, the Rum Currant Scones were perfectly rum flavored, and not overpoweringly so. The addition of a icing made with the remaining soaking liquid (ie raisin flavored rum!) – well, that really took it up a notch! The Rum Raisin Scones were already so rummy on their own that the rum-raisin icing was overkill.

Whether or not the alcohol baked out in the oven…I myself am not so sure. Prior to trying the raisin version I would have automatically said yes, of course it bakes off, no problem. Having tried the raisin scones myself – WHOOOO!!! I say there’s still some active rum in there. It makes for a very mellow morning, but alligator tears from the scone-spoiled 4 year old who was told that no, she couldn’t have any – these scones are for Mommies and Daddies only. Oh the heartbreak and betrayal on her tiny face!

On the other hand, I am very sensitive to alcohol and you and yours may not be as sensitive. Still and all, either way, these would be a novel addition to any brunch spread.

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.comSince we’re talking about fruit soaked in alcohol, let’s talk about vanilla for a sec, m’kay?! I was inspired to explore a new frontier of baking trickery involving soaking halved vanilla beans in alcohol for 2-4 weeks in order to squooosh out the seeds rather than hoping not to cut myself while slicing dried vanilla pods and scraping out the seeds. It didn’t work out for me in this application, but soaked vanilla pods are an interesting technique in general and one I’ll be experimenting with more in the future (as outlined in Innovations in Vanilla).

What new scones or other inspiration are coming out of your kitchen these days? You know we’d love to hear about it!

May 9, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
2 Comments

Innovations in Vanilla

Rum Raisin Scones on LaughingLemonPie.comTwo things converged recently that lead me into a new arena of baking trickery.

First I read a Facebook post by Good Cheap Eats about buying vanilla beans in bulk from Amazon.

Reaction #1: Whaaaaahhhhttt?!

Reaction #2: Duh! I buy everything else off Amazon, why not vanilla beans?

Reaction #3: How had that not occurred to me before?!

Why was I feeling guilty for buying pricey vanilla beans in twos or threes from Penzey’s or Trader Joe’s when I could afford many more by buying them vacuum-packed and in bulk online? AYE! No longer.

Nearly simultaneously I read a short tip in Cooks Illustrated (based on something they saw on CHOW via guru Sarabeth Levine) about storing halved vanilla beans in vodka or rum for two weeks then simply squoooshing out the tiny seeds from moist and pliant pods rather than trying to not cut yourself while cutting a pod in half lengthwise then scraping out the seeds. Hard to explain, but here’s the Cooks Illustrated write up and here’s the (46 second) video from CHOW illustrating the point:

On their own these two items might have been interesting-but-lost-on-me bits of info – but together! Mwooohahaha! A harmonic convergence I was open to trying out.

Unfortunately, for me the results are as of yet inconclusive.

On the one hand it is definitely worth trying, especially with low-priced beans. Unfortunately, in both the Rum Raisin and Rum Currant Scone recipes, the vanilla flavor was drowned out by the pervasive rum flavor. Not the best recipe to showcase this new technique to it’s fullest, but an intriguing notion nonetheless.

Subsequently I tried the vanilla seeds from my vodka and rum soaked beans in a soon-to-be-blogged Clementine Carrot Vanilla Cream Quick Bread (uhhh, yeah, the title is a work in progress). There, the alcohol flavor of the soaking liquid overtook the vanilla flavor, and didn’t cook out or cook off as I expected.

However, I am quite sensitive to alcohol and maybe this isn’t a problem for other bakers and other palettes.

I noticed that the beans were much more pliable and I got a lot more seeds out after about 4 weeks of soaking. There’s really no limit to how long you could soak these, the alcohol should preserve them until you’re ready to use.

I am not planning to re-dry and grind the pods as Sarabeth does in the video – Cooks Illustrated tried and concluded that it wasn’t really worthwhile. Actually, so far I’ve just been putting squooshed beans back into the soaking jar and finding that further soaking yields more seeds. I imagine I’ll do a vanilla rum sugar once I’m sure the pods are spent.

Overall, I’m not sure yet about this process and idea. I have a second order in for more vanilla beans, so I’ll keep tinkering with it and get back to you. In the meantime – let us know if you try it, have heard of the idea, do this already, or if you have any other vanilla ideas and innovations!

paleo banana muffins

May 4, 2015
by Lacy
1 Comment

Adding Instead of Subtracting and Paleo Banana Muffins

I’ve mentioned on this blog before that I (Lacy) was diagnosed with an eating disorder when I started seeing a therapist last summer after the death of my father.

From a purely scientific perspective, it’s been a fascinating process — looking at all my weird idiosyncrasies when it comes to food, discovering the strange rules I’ve created for myself around food and trying to identify whose voice is really echoing around in my head when I hear negative things.

When I’m feeling less scientific, the whole thing sucks major monkey butt.

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April 27, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
1 Comment

Almonds: Oh, Yeah.

At Laughing Lemon Pie, we love almonds and almond products like almond butter, almond milk, and almond flour. Beyond their inherent deliciousness, this great infographic from Nuts.com justifies our almond adoration by pointing out the health benefits of almonds and almond products.

We’ve found almond flour and almond butter to be a healthy alternative or substitution for more nutritious recipes and/or dairy-free and gluten-free meals. Here are a few of our favorite almond recipes and ideas:

Vegan Thumbprint Cookie Mix

Banana Almond Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

84 Healthy Snack Ideas

Almond Fruit Tart

Gluten-Free, Vegan Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cookie Dough—For One

Almonds_Yeah_v04This infographic was provided to Laughing Lemon Pie by Nuts.com.

Nuts.com is an online source for nuts and seeds of all kinds, including almonds and almond flour.

This Earth Day REUSE! on LaughingLemonPie.com

April 21, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
1 Comment

REUSE!: How (and why) I’ve Banished Plastic Storage Bags.

This Earth Day REUSE! on LaughingLemonPie.comIf you were to look in my freezer you’d think I have a problem. A yogurt problem. A frozen yogurt problem. Or, if you were more generous, you might think “well…maybe there was a big sale???”

No, no – What looks like a freezer full of frozen yogurt is actually choc-a-block full of extra servings of Texas Red Chili, Gumbo Z’Herbes, and everything I’ve made in the slow cooker lately. Reusing yogurt containers is my salute to the every-day-is-Earth-Day idea, and key to how I’ve banished plastic storage bags from our grocery list, kitchen, and landfills.

We all know the 3 Rs of Recycling, right?: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. (Tune in around 1:30 in this video to hear/see Jack Johnson’s 3 Rs song.) For us babes of the 80s, recycling was a moral imperative drilled into us at school along with Just Say No and Don’t Even Think About Smoking!

But the emphasis as I recall it was primarily on the 3rd R: Recycling. Unless I missed a week of school, we kind of glossed over reduce and reuse. But did you know the 3 Rs are listed IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE? Yup. That’s the order you’re supposed to think about them in – FIRST, Reduce. Failing that, SECOND, Reuse. And only as a very last resort do we get to the THIRD R: Recycle.

As speculated by Jaymi Heimbuch over at TreeHugger, recycling might get all the attention because “it doesn’t require us to change the important habits, like shifting what items we buy in the first place so we avoid excessive packaging and disposable items.” Ahhhh…perceptive. We all know how hard habits are to break, right? When I think back on how many times I wrapped an unused 1/2 an onion in a plastic baggie…well, I can only groan inwardly and shake my head at former myself. Using plastic storage bags was something I had gotten in the habit of, and disposing of them was something I accepted as OK.

For me then, swapping out disposable plastic storage bags in favor of reusable plastic yogurt containers was a two-fer – saving used plastic bags from the landfill, and keeping yogurt containers from being downcycled in the recycling process.

Glass, metal, and paper recycling is a fairly well-done process which consumes a relatively reasonable amount of energy and results in a comparable if not good-as-new product. But plastic? Oh, how I wish the same were true. Plastic recycling is fraught – requiring a staggering amount of energy and resulting in a product inferior to the original. More on the plastic recycling process as well as a video tour of a plastic bottle recycling facility can be found at TreeHugger.

Not only are plastic storage bags just landfill filler-uppers, but looking back on it I don’t even think they’re really that great at food storage! There are many things I didn’t like about using ziptop bags to store extra servings of food bound for the freezer: finding a way to fill them without the bag tipping over and spilling out the contents; figuring out how to freeze them flat; and then having a freezer full of sharp, hard, and slippery stacked hazards. Of course, the plastic would tear easily onOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAce frozen and jostled around with all the other contents of the freezer as I dug around and tried not to get stabbed by one of these dinners in a bag or bludgeoned in a cascade if they all turned mutinous. I’d also forgotten how fun it was to thaw these frozen dinners out – leaving a bag of soup to thaw in the fridge all day only to find at dinnertime that half the contents are coating the interior and various recesses of said fridge because of an invisible hole or tear. Wow. Add to that my opinion that the darn things are expensive too, and it becomes pretty clear that what was meant to be a kitchen solution turned into a problem for me.

And so they’ve been banished – for the future they are banned from my grocery list, and for the now they’re gone from the kitchen. The boxes I already own have been banished to the basement pantry room for thoughtful, selective, and infrequent use. The former plastic bag drawer gets is now freed up for something more in-demand: yogurt container lids. 😉

Whether storing in plastic bags or in plastic containers,  let’s ignore the whole BPA argument for the moment. Please? Thanks. Cuz honestly I don’t know what to think about that anymore. You can find plenty of people saying The War on Science March 2015 National Geographicthat BPA is the worst thing ever, while the FDA and others assure the public that this ubiquitous type of plastic is safe. What really is the worst thing ever is that BPA is so pervasive, AND that the substitute used in the “BPA Free!” items now for sale was actually found to be more harmful than BPA! ARG. “We face risks we can’t easily analyze” says Joel Achenback (National Geographic March 2015: Why Do Many Reasonable People Doubt Science?), and I couldn’t agree more.

I don’t want to contribute to The War on Science, so the plastic compromise I’ve made in our house is that we don’t heat-n-eat out of plastic anymore. I have a small collection of glass containers for reheating, or I use our regular plates and bowls with either a plate or bowl on top as a cover.

I’ve found so many uses for yogurt containers, not just freezer food storage. Around here you’ll see them as marker, crayon, bead, etc. storage, we use them as planters, for dry goods storage (for pancake mix, graham crackers, wasa, etc.), and as palettes for painting projects. I even use empty yogurt containers as mini compost bins – a nice and lidded container I keep near the trash so OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAit’s easy to take out to the compost bin later.

Lest you confuse me for a paragon of Earth Day perfectionism, I’ll confess two things: I use baby wipes (a lot more than the mother of a 4 year old needs to), and I take nice long hot showers. On the one hand, I’m working on those things. On the other hand, I’ve had to cut myself some slack.

I was really getting into the waste-free thing there for a while, and putting a lot of pressure on myself about it. In the end though, as the pendulum found its way back to center we’ve adopted cloth napkins, cut an ancient towel into 8 pieces as a sometimes paper towel substitute, and stopped using plastic wrap and plastic storage bags. If I was really serious about no-impact living, you know I’d make my own yogurt every week and use glass canning jars to store it. 😉

Plastic yogurt containers are what I reuse cuz that’s what we have a steady stream and supply of around here. But look around your house and fridge – what is coming in that you could re-purpose before sending back out as waste? Remember the 3 steps – if you couldn’t find a way to reduce or refuse the packaging, think momentarily and creatively about reusing it before sending it into the recycling stream.

Service Review: Hello Fresh Delivery on LaughingLemonPie.com

April 15, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
0 comments

Service Review: Hello Fresh Delivery

Do you dread grocery shopping and/or meal planning? Even if you don’t actively haaaate it, everyone hits a rut sometimes, needs a break, or gets overwhelmed with other priorities. Service Review: Hello Fresh Delivery on LaughingLemonPie.com

There are a whole host of services that aim to make getting a healthy home-cooked dinner on the table a whole lot easier. I recently tried Hello Fresh which takes meal planning and grocery shopping off your to-do list with a simple subscription and delivery service.

Ingredients for 3 meals arrived on my doorstep carefully preserved in a sturdy and insulated box, along with a beautiful brochure-like mini-cookbook of the 3 recipes all laid out with photos and easy-to-follow directions.

My Hello Fresh box came packed with absolutely every ingredient needed to make 3 dinners: Spicy Poblano Chili, Hearty Winter Soup with Cannellini Beans, and Mustard Crusted Chicken with Roasted Veggies. They even sent mini-packs of shredded cheddar and sour cream for the chili!

I served the chicken with Trader Joe’s harvest grains warm side salad, served the chili with cornbread, and the soup with store-bought french bread. The chicken was by far our favorite – really really nice. One of those meals that is just so simple yet so satisfying. And it was an all-in-one-pan dish, which was great for clean up. The chili was good also (I’m crazy about chili!). The soup was pretty plain – good enough, very nutritious and healthy, but no ‘wow’ factor.

Hello Fresh selects the menu, portions and packages all the raw ingredients (for either 2 or 4 servings), and provides clear instructions on how to complete the recipe at home. They plan, shop, portion, collate, instruct, and ship – you prep, cook, and handle waste and clean-up. Hello Fresh subscribers can choose between meals for a vegetarian or omnivorous lifestyle. Their website features an excellent selection of recipes that give a broader idea of their meals, the variety, and style.

This particular service is ideal for those who don’t feel confident or capable of meal-planning, it makes cooking very easy – the ingredients are all there with clear instructions on how to prepare and cook them. This would make a great gift for a someone who hadn’t mastered cooking for themselves, just starting out living on their own, or the (stereotypical) newlyweds. Hello Fresh would give a great education and easy foundation from which they could do dinner on their own once they felt more confident or capable.

Service Review: Hello Fresh Delivery on LaughingLemonPie.comFor me, it was hard to get over the amount of waste a service like this generates. Each 2-serving ingredient was individually wrapped, so there was a lot of plastic and packaging going to waste. Hello Fresh has a few recycling options via their Go Green initiative. That takes care of the big items, but this particular service model is not for the zero-impact, zero-landfill, zero-waste, No Impact (Wo)Men among us.

Another way this service wasn’t for me was the wasted opportunities I felt during prep. 2/3 of the recipes I sampled were the kind of thing I would normally make in bulk and freeze to save time/money. That’s where I’m just not the ideal customer for this service – I know too much and am a bit too clever in the kitchen. 😉 I kept thinking about ways to make it all more efficiently, but had to remind myself to just follow the instructions. Hello Fresh really provides an easy to follow plan for getting great food on the table, but in a very one-night-at-a-time and step-by-step way that is ideal for kitchen/dinner novices.

Alternately, it occurred to me that we all have seasons where we just aren’t feeling inspired about dinner at all. And/or seasons where getting to the store is just one thing too many on the old to-do list – like tax season for a CPA, or soccer season for a soccer family. 3 nights of Hello Fresh could be a way to achieve the ultimate goal of a fresh home-cooked dinner without resorting to Chipotle or pizza every night. You’ve got those other 4 nights of the week for Chipotle! 😉 A service like Hello Fresh does seem expensive, but thinking about it in comparison to eating out at Chipotle gives some perspective. With the subscription service you can easily opt-in and opt-out each week as needed.

As it turned out, Hello Fresh wasn’t right for me and my style, but it would definitely be right for someone! Well packaged, well organized, thoughtful meals ready to prepare, cook, and enjoy.

Does Hello Fresh sound like something that would help you out? They’ve offered us a discount code for 25% off! Enter code LEMONPIE – give it a try and let us know what YOU think!

Creamy Toasted Red Chile Soup from LaughingLemonPie.com

April 6, 2015
by Emily Klopstein
1 Comment

Creamy Toasted Red Chile Soup

Nearly a year ago now I stumbled upon the tortilla soup that changed everything – Rick Bayless’ version of Tortilla Soup with Swiss Chard. It was and still is unlike any tortilla soup I’d had before.

You’ve tasted the insipid can-see-clear-to-the-bottom-of-the-bowl versions of tortilla soup, I’m sure. This recipe is based on a very opaque foundation of red chile – that was a big ah-ha moment for me, and one of many I’m ever grateful to Bayless for.

Since first finding and trying it, I’ve made and remade this recipe a few times, further simplifying and modifying as I go. Last May, my initial thoughts about this soup were: “such a revelation! Thanks to Food52 for bringing this into my life and mouth. Not your run of the mill tortilla soup. Wonderful depth of flavor from a meatless soup. I added a can of black beans just to bulk it out a bit, tripled the amount of tomato, skipped the chard, and uh…needless to say I did not make my own tortilla chips.”

Anyone know if quotes are appropriate when quoting oneself? Or ones former self – so much changes in a year around here, I’m hardly that same person anymore! 😉

Anyhow – I was definitely on the right track with adding the beans. AND with skipping making my own chips! (Sheesh! As if.) My latest and favoritest iteration involves the addition of just a touch of cream, putting this soup well into the Party in My Tummy category of things.

Creamy Toasted Red Chile Soup from LaughingLemonPie.com

Creamy Toasted Red Chile Soup

Serving Size: about 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons oil, divided
  • 4-5 dried pasilla chiles (or sub another mild, fruity dried red chile)
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 medium white onion, roughly chopped
  • 14.5 oz can fire roasted tomatoes
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 15oz can black beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1/4-1/2 cup cream (add more or less to your taste)
  • salt to taste (depends on the saltiness of the broth)
  • optional toppings:
  • tortilla chips (this is a great way to use up the broken chip bits in the bottom of the bag)
  • queso fresco crumbles
  • ribbon-cut chard leaves
  • sliced or diced avocado

Instructions

  1. Use kitchen scissors to cut the pasillas into roughly 1" squares. Discard the stems, remove as many seeds as you like (more seeds = more heat).
  2. Toast the chile pieces carefully in small pan with about 1 T oil over moderate heat until they change to a very brown-red, almost black (but not blackened!) - like dark mahogany.
  3. Place the toasted chile squares in a bowl, and add hot water just to cover. Place a second, smaller bowl onto and within that bowl to submerge the chiles. Let them soak for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Add another tablespoon of oil to that same pan and lightly fry the onion and garlic. You don't want them overly soft, just want to get a bit of color on them but not all the way to sweet and caramelized.
  5. Once the 30 minutes is up, place the re-hydrated chiles & their soaking water, onions & garlic, canned tomatoes, and 1 cup chicken broth in a blender. Blend until smooth.
  6. Pour the blender contents through a sieve (to catch any big chile pieces) and into a soup pot or dutch oven.
  7. Add the rest of the chicken broth, black beans, and cream. Stir, warm, and salt to taste.
  8. Serve with optional toppings.

Notes

* If you're into doing less dishes, all the steps can be accomplished in one single pot - a dutch oven would work nicely, or any pot you usually use for soup.

* In the summer you could use fresh tomatoes for this recipe - place the tomatoes, garlic, and onion under the broiler for about 10 minutes until they get a good bit of color.

http://laughinglemonpie.com/creamy-toasted-red-chile-soup/

Do you have a favorite tortilla soup recipe or memory? We’d love to hear about it!